3 Alternatives To PowerPoint

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Bored of PowerPoint? Consider trying something new in your classes with these three presentation tools you might not be familiar with:

EMAZE

Emaze calls itself “the next generation of online presentation software.” Students can select from different templates to create visually stunning presentations. Presentations are made using proprietary HTML5  software that runs seamlessly on any browser. Emaze is an impressive tool that can help students focus on visuals and the audience instead of text.

Screen Shot 2015-02-07 at 1.00.37 PMPros: Free, very impressive 3-D-like templates, easy-to-use, cloud-based, fluid transitions between slides, easy to incorporate graphics and other media

Cons: Limited number of templates, might not be best for displaying a great deal of data, not optimized for tablets (yet)

Here’s a link to how Emaze works.

HAIKU DECK

Haiku Deck helps users create “presentations that inspire” by limiting text, simplifying a message, and incorporating  images that add depth. It is a wonderful product that is easily shared online and lends itself to visually stunning presentation. It’s as if the coolest graphic designer around created a presentation tool just for you.

Pros: Free, many stock images to use, can upload images and screenshots from desktop, can be used on tablets, perhaps the best graphics and fonts on the web, public notes can be added to slides to help give them context, easy to share online, creates beautiful presentations

Cons: A bit of a learning curve to master software, no videos can be embedded into a presentation

Here’s a link to how Haiku Deck works on a desktop; here’s a link to how it works on an iPad.

Prezi

Prezi is not necessarily a new presentation tool (it’s been around since 2009) but it’s one of my favorites. It’s easy to use, cloud-based and great for including multimedia. Presentations created with Prezi might not be as stunning as ones created with Emaze or Haiku Deck but they can be just as fun and effective. It’s a great product to use with groups since students can edit presentations at the same time and from different computers. Prezi is like an old, reliable friend–one that can still help you create fantastic presentations.

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Pros: Can be modified by different users at the same time, easy to incorporate video files, can accommodate substantial text, fun to use, can be used on an iPad, incorporates motion into a presentation (see cons), will auto-sync your presentations across devices

Cons: A bit of a learning curve to master software, limited space unless upgrading to the paid version (I pay $59 a year for more space and the ability to keep presentations private), too much motion can leave viewers with motion sickness

Here’s a link to how Prezi works.

All three of these tools can be mastered by students quickly and will encourage less text and more audience interaction during a presentation. During a future lesson, consider training17having students choose one of these three tools and create a presentation using them. As students move into college and the workforce, they will likely have to give many presentations. These three platforms can help students develop important presentation skills while also helping them avoid some of the traditional bad presentation habits that can form when using only PowerPoint and Keynote.

2 thoughts on “3 Alternatives To PowerPoint

  1. Less words, a couple of key photos… Great way to hook learners into a new problem based learning project. I just observed a middle school lesson where one of these platforms would have been perfect.

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